Storing and Using Dried Foods


Dehydrators are efficient and come in a variety of models.
Now that you have sun-dried your tomatoes, air dried your parsley, dehydrated your apples and oven-dried your pumpkin seeds...what do you do with all this food!

Proper storage is very important. The first thing that you will want to do is finish off your large batches by putting them in a plastic bucket in a warm, dry and well-ventilated space. Stir the batch about twice per day. (This process is not necessary with most spices and foods that are thoroughly dried.)

Place your dried produce in zip-lock sealed bags or tightly closed jars. Be sure to fill the container to the top and remove all the air possible. Remember, air and moisture are now our enemy. It is best to make the container size "serving size", if possible, so you do not have to repeatedly expose the dried goods to the air. It is best to store in a cool and dry place. Darkness will also help preserve the color.

Many dried fruits and spices can be eaten straight from the container. Others should be rehydrated. This means pouring boiling water over the dried fruit or vegetable and allowing it to sit for a considerable period (from minutes to hours). Beans are often rehydrated by leaving them sit in water over night.

Return to Drying Page.


Read our review of the Excalibur ED2900 Food Dehydrator.

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Preserving food is a great way to stretch your budget, help the environment and live a healthier life all at the same time. Thanks for visiting our site, we hope that you will come back often to rediscover the magic of preserving food.

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